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Could you really quit your day job and rely on AppStore?

bluethunderbluethunder Member Posts: 33
edited November -1 in Miscellaneous
I always wanted to create some useful application on the iPhone but I don't have the knowledge of Objective C.

Now that I come across GS and I found that it really helps me in a many ways.

I have created 2 games (pending app store approval) and have great hope in it.

1. Could app selling in the app store keeps you alive?
2. Is it ok to quit the day job just concentrating on creating high quality games with GS.
3. Would GS one day rejected by Apple for no apparent reason I can think of?
4. How much does an average GS game creator earn per month from the sales of the app?
5. Or it can only be extra pocket money? Not to even mention break even from GS and Apple dev annual subscriptions.

Really need some serious advice here.

Thank you.

Comments

  • Ing3nuIng3nu Member Posts: 22
    Just from talking to and observing other devs:

    1. If you have *enough* of them, and they do okay, possibly. Or if you get a runaway hit like AngryBird.

    2. Probably not just yet. Wait until your games hit the market to see how they do first.

    3. Apple is fractious, but not stupid. GS might be rejected for $X but would be allowed back in after review.

    4. No idea yet.

    5. Most likely scenario is pocket money until you hit a critical mass of games published or get a breakout hit.
  • beefy_clyrobeefy_clyro Member Posts: 5,390
    1. Could app selling in the app store keeps you alive?

    Sure - I think you can easily make enough to keep you in food and water. Whether it will keep up with your mortgage payments are another question.

    2. Is it ok to quit the day job just concentrating on creating high quality games with GS.

    The app store is a funny game itself. You can spend ages making a really polished game but for one reason or another, it simply doesnt sell. You can then make a fairly good game in a short amount of space and have it completely outsell all your others. Alot comes down to luck and timing.

    3. Would GS one day rejected by Apple for no apparent reason I can think of?

    There was a case going on with Apple rejecting 3rd party tools creating games, GS was never affected, the Gendai team have always remained they dont see a problem and that they hold a good relationship with Apple.

    4. How much does an average GS game creator earn per month from the sales of the app?

    It really does vary! Some people are making $100 + a day, others are amking $1 a day. Depends on quality, quantity, luck and timing ... Plus promoting ... Always the hardest bit!

    5. Or it can only be extra pocket money? Not to even mention break even from GS and Apple dev annual subscriptions.

    Some may struggle to break even, as long as you put the time to polish stuff off, i think you'd easily break even :)
  • CaptainChocoCaptainChoco Member, BASIC Posts: 124
    I've already quit my day job!
    I used to make some games for PC, PS2, PSP and etc for over 10 years and someday I realized I want more!! So I quit last year.
    Now I'm making board games(Paper games like Catan), iphone games(not with GS), SNG with my friends as a team.
    Making games with GS alone(actually with my little sis) is just a hobby for now but I hope I could make good games someday.
    My opinion is... just quitting your day job without any money is too risky. (but that's what I did...)
    As I'm novice here I don't know jack about GS dev... but I believe if you have a dream... just go for it. There's always a way to survive.
    As for me... after 10 months of dark passage... I could get a chance... small but precious one and that was the beginning of my own small biz.

    Cheers, bluethunder.
  • peachpellenpeachpellen Member Posts: 977
    GS is listed on the Apple site under developer tools - and their latest developer guidelines make it clear that third party apps are OK now.

    Gendai sent out an email about it earlier in the month.

    IMHO, GS is solid.
  • butterbeanbutterbean Member, PRO Posts: 4,315
    Yes, keep your day job until you have a good amount of games under your belt, and a decent income from the app store coming your way, the app store is far too risky as it is, and not an easy place to maintain income. It's very temperamental and very, very unpredictable
  • peachpellenpeachpellen Member Posts: 977
    Just to add something here - I'm fairly new to having apps on the store - my first one went up around August 15th and the total of my cut from sales is about $215 in yeah, around a month and a half now.

    I only have 4 apps up, one of which is free.

    It isn't hard to, at the very least, recoup your license costs in a timely manner.
  • goliathgoliath Member Posts: 1,435
    Peach, what games do you have out and what's your biggest seller (if you don't Mind me asking)...

    Check out my video game website: http://myvideogamenews.com

    Check out my mobile game and art website. If you need artwork for your games, hit me up: http://academy413.wordpress.com

  • PhoticsPhotics Member Posts: 4,172
    Burnout is my biggest issue. I just can't seem to find the energy to create another game. After 14 apps on the iTunes App Store, (plus one in review) it's just not that fun anymore.

    It's like the story of Sisyphus... pushing a big rock up the hill. Releasing an app is like watching a big rock roll down the hill. Sometimes it goes the way you want, other times it moves in ways beyond your control. Once the initial surge has passed, it's back to pushing another rock up the hill. You keep pushing rocks over the hill, wondering if this will be the one that leads to success.

    But when it doesn't, you realize the insanity of the objective!

    There are 250,000+ apps... 15,000+ developers... how are you going to stand out? You have to be ultra competitive. You have to be really passionate about this stuff. You have to stay adaptable, able to move with the changes of the market. You have to be prepared for failure, able to learn from your mistakes.

    So, why am I still in the game?

    • I like this stuff.
    • Making games is more productive than just playing them.
    • It does make some money.

    My suggestion - keep your mind open to other possibilities. My most successful GameSalad game wasn't a game at all. It's my textbook about making GameSalad games. What's nice about GameSalad development is that involves so many different professions. It might lead to a more rewarding career. I see iOS development as an excellent side income, something that's fun but also rewarding. To do it full time, that could ruin the fun.
  • BeyondtheTechBeyondtheTech Member Posts: 809
    I like what Photics said, and, for me, I think it a lot of it could roll back to Gendai. If GameSalad's next update includes a lot of neat and new features, it could spark some inspiration for people who have burnout. Imagine if all our games could incorporate GameCenter or OpenFeint, or if we could come out with games that utilize the microphone or camera, or even that suggestion I made in the past - come out with "GameSalad Server" to host some sort of multiplayer capability, that would really spark some interest in creating a lot of new and cool stuff.

    There are a number of game styles that can be made and be successful with what GameSalad's engine currently offers, and if we could get things like arrays and better manipulation of text, that opens the door for even a lot more types of games we could make.

    Of course, a smart AppStore developer would keep their eyes open and use any and all the resources at hand to get the job done, which is why I own GS, Corona, and Torque 2D, each powerful in their own right.

    If I can make my annual salary and pay for healthcare, then I would quit my day job. If anything, it's the lack of available time to create more apps is my biggest issue, so it's kind of a Catch-22. So, until I get lucky creating an app in the limited time I have and crack it big with even a moderate return in a short amount of time, I'm still in the rat race of a 9-to-5 job.
  • peachpellenpeachpellen Member Posts: 977
    goliath said:
    Peach, what games do you have out and what's your biggest seller (if you don't Mind me asking)...

    Currently the apps I have up are;
    Castle Climber (my first app)
    Castle Climber Lite (free, obviously)
    Zombie Hunter
    Zombie Hunter HD
    Poop Machine

    According to App Annie, these are the lifetime stats, keeping in mind lifetime is only 6 weeks at the most, and that is for Castle Climber;

    Castle Climber: $76.10 (6 weeks)
    Zombie Hunter: $14.88 (2 weeks)
    Zombie Hunter HD: $48.03 (2 weeks)
    Poop Machine: $80.09 (4.5 weeks)

    As you can see it's hard to say what the best earner is - Zombie Hunter for the iPhone did poorly while the iPad version is, dollar/days up the highest earner, followed by Poop Machine.

    Poop Machine was never discussed here as I'm frankly a little bit embarrassed by it; I originally made it just to entertain my partner as he finds that kind of humor amusing, but then I figured I may as well upload it. It's climbing, slowly but surely, in the US - it's still around 700 right now but 5 days ago it wasn't even in the top 1000.

    I love playing certain kinds of games myself, and I try to appeal to people by making games I enjoy playing myself.

    Castle Climber wasn't spectacular but for a first game it was great IMHO - a good start.

    Zombie Hunter for the iPhone was a flop really - and that's OK - the iPad version is far better - the small screen just made it hard for what I was going for.

    I have 5 apps in review right now and am working on a new game that will take me months most likely - but I think that at least two of the apps in review (there's 5 as two have iPad versions as well) will do better than my current games.

    I'm no expert but simple, pleasing graphics seem to help. Also, bright colours! People are naturally inclined to be happier when they see bright, vibrant colours.

    Sorry, that was really rambly for what you asked. I felt I needed to clarify a little, but being tired I got a tad off track.

    /backs away slowly.
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