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display y position without numbers after the ,

-Timo--Timo- Posts: 2,313Member
how can you display the texts of a constrained y position without numbers after the ,
hope I explained enough
thanks :)

Comments

  • ericzingelerericzingeler Posts: 334Member
    yes: padint(position.y,0)
  • -Timo--Timo- Posts: 2,313Member
  • -Timo--Timo- Posts: 2,313Member
  • -Timo--Timo- Posts: 2,313Member
    oh no there is not sorry :) there was still standing /10 haha :D thanks this worked
  • SocksSocks London, UK.Posts: 12,822Member
    @timolapre1998

    . . . . or another way:

    floor( self.Position.Y )
  • -Timo--Timo- Posts: 2,313Member
    thanks :) is there a tutorial where I can see what all the functions like floor padint abs and acos do?
  • SocksSocks London, UK.Posts: 12,822Member
    edited June 2013
    @timolapre1998

    abs

    Usage: abs(x)

    The absolute value of the number. i.e. make the number positive if it is negative.

    Examples:

    abs(-42) = 42

    abs(42) = 42

    Usage Example: Combined with a cosine or sine function, you can make an actor “hop” in a pattern.


    . . . . . . . . . .


    acos

    Usage: acos(x)

    The trigonometric arccosine (inverse cosine) function. Values can only range from -1 to 1 with results from 180 to 0, respectively. Any other input values will result in ‘nan’.


    . . . . . . . . . .



    asin

    Usage: asin(x)

    The trigonometric arcsine (inverse sine) function. Values can only range from -1 to 1 with results from -90 to 90, respectively. Any other input values will result in ‘nan’.


    . . . . . . . . . .



    atan

    Usage: atan(x)

    The trigonometric arctangent (inverse tangent) function. Results will range from -90 to 90.


    . . . . . . . . . .



    ceil

    Usage: ceil(x)

    The integer when you round up a value. e.g. ceil(0) = 0 , ceil(0.004) = 1


    . . . . . . . . . .



    cos

    Usage: cos(x)

    The trigonometric cosine function. If the value that you use the cosine function on starts at 0, your resulting value will start at the maximum value of cosine. i.e. cos(0) = 1. Check out other possibilities of sine and cosine at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trigonometric_functions


    . . . . . . . . . .




    exp

    Usage: exp(x)

    The exponential function, e^x where e is the number (approximately 2.718281828).

    Check out other possibilities at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exponential_function


    . . . . . . . . . .



    floor

    Usage: floor(x)

    The integer when you round down a value.

    Example: floor(0) = 0 , floor(0.004) = 0


    . . . . . . . . . .


    ln

    Usage: ln(x)

    The natural logarithm of a value. The natural logarithm is the logarithm to the base e, where e is an irrational constant approximately equal to 2.718281828.

    Check out other possibilities at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natural_logarithm

    Example: ln(e) = 1


    . . . . . . . . . .



    log10

    Usage: log10(x)

    The base 10 logarithm of a value.

    Check out other possibilities at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logarithm

    Example: log10(10) = 1, log10(100) = 2


    . . . . . . . . . .



    magnitude

    Usage: magnitude(x,y)

    Find the length of a line segment from the origin, (0,0), to the given point. You can include an offset,(x',y'), to find the length between the two points. i.e. magnitude(x-x',y-y')

    Example: If I wanted to find the length between my actor at coordinates (25,30) and another actor at coordinates (100,240), I would use the expression magnitude(25-100,30-240).


    . . . . . . . . . .


    max

    Usage: max(x,y)

    Return the higher value of two numbers or variable values.


    . . . . . . . . . .



    min

    Usage: min(x,y)

    Return the smaller value of two numbers or variable values.

    Example: min(12,35) = 12


    . . . . . . . . . .



    pow

    Usage: pow(x,y)

    Return the value of x to the power of y.

    Example: power(2,3) = 222 = 8


    . . . . . . . . . .



    random

    Usage: random(x,y)

    Generate a random integer equal to or between the first integer value and the second integer value.

    Example: random(1,10) can be any number from the set of {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10}.


    . . . . . . . . . .



    sin

    Usage: sin(x)

    The trigonometric sine function. This is similar to the cosine function but it is offset by one quarter of a wave cycle.

    Tip: If you use the sine function and start your incrementing variable at 0(using the example above), your actor’s movement does not start at the middle between the minimum and maximum points of the wave.


    . . . . . . . . . .



    sqrt

    Usage: sqrt(x)

    Square root of a value. Input values less than 0 will result in ‘nan’.


    . . . . . . . . . .



    tan

    Usage: tan(x)

    The trigonometric tangent function.


    . . . . . . . . . .



    vectorToAngle

    Usage: vectorToAngle(x,y)

    Find the angle relative to the origin, (0,0), given an X and Y coordinate. You can include an offset,(x',y'), to find an angle relative to the offset.

    e.g. vectorToAngle(x-x',y-y')
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