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Vector Images

Hello everyone.
How can I use save a file in InkScape and it still have it be vector image, but import into GameSalad?
For instance, I'm trying to get the quality of vector, but when I save the image as a .SVG, it doesn't save it as an image file, just an InkScape file, which I don't want.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks :)

Best Answer

Answers

  • DanjinkiesDanjinkies Posts: 13Member, PRO
    Hello, you can't import vector files into Gamesalad, only jpegs and pngs. The thing with vector files is that it can only be read and altered by vector editing software. You will need to determine the image sizes that you will need for your game (Background, Actors, etc.) and then use InkScape to size it accordingly and import it into Gamesalad as a png.

    Hope that helps!
  • allc1865allc1865 Posts: 777Member, PRO
    @danjinkies, hi thanks for your reply. Is there a way to get vector quality but still have it be a .png file extension? Thanks. :) ;)
  • bryanearlbryanearl Wasilla, AlaskaPosts: 49Member, PRO
    @allc1865, there is no standard "quality" difference between a vector, jpg, png etc. It is all about the size (ex: 800x600) and resolution (ex: 72dpi). Out of curiosity, why are you wanting a vector specifically? What exactly are you trying to do, and why have you found that a PNG is not working for you?
  • SocksSocks London, UK.Posts: 12,822Member
    allc1865 said:

    @danjinkies, hi thanks for your reply. Is there a way to get vector quality but still have it be a .png file extension? Thanks. :) ;)

    Like bryanearl says, there is no difference in quality between a vector file and a rasterised file when they are the same size . . . . . so a vector file occupying 512 x 512 pixels will be identical to a PNG occupying 512 x 512 pixels.
  • allc1865allc1865 Posts: 777Member, PRO
    @bryanearl, Hi, thank you for your reply. I was just wondering if I could get a way to save the vector file image .SVG as a .PNG because I wanted the vector image quality, that, when you zoom in and keep zooming in, it will never get blurry. That's why I was wondering if there was a way to do this... However you can't. I need it to be saved out as a .PNG, which is a Bitmap file and it will get pixilated if you zoom in too much.
    I don't have any problem with PNG. I actually need a PNG to save and work in GameSalad.

    Thanks ;):)
  • ArmellineArmelline Posts: 4,760Member, PRO
    All a vector file really is is defined relationships between the graphical elements in it. That's why you can zoom in and in and every time you zoom the computer is calculating where each part should be in relation to each other part, and drawing it on your screen. So in theory you could use a vector image (of sorts) in GameSalad, you'd just need to essentially write a vector program within your GameSalad project.

    If you make a basic shape, say a star, using the default actors in GameSalad and keep enlarging them and enlarging them, they'll maintain their crisp edges. That's because GameSalad is using them like vector images. For more complex images or shapes, you'd need a lot of very convoluted rules. Theoretically it's possible, at least to some extent. You'd be a madman to attempt it, however :D

    In other words, no. :P

    ..aaaaand now I'm thinking about Descartes and Leibniz and absolute and relative space. Sigh.
  • SocksSocks London, UK.Posts: 12,822Member
    edited January 2014
    Like @Armelline said, you could - in theory - produce simple vector images within GameSalad, but after a while the men in white coats will come to take you away to the special 'hospital' so you can have some 'rest'.

    You can also produce images which you can shrink and enlarge without them becoming blurry or pixelated by simply rasterizing your vector images at the largest size they will be viewed, perhaps not always a viable choice but it works for certain set-ups, I have a game where the images are almost twice the resolution of a Retina iPad screen, so you can zoom in without their quality degrading.

  • motorcycle boymotorcycle boy Posts: 429Member
    Socks said:

    Like @Armelline said, you could - in theory - produce simple vector images within GameSalad, but after a while the men in white coats will come to take you away to the special 'hospital' so you can have some 'rest'.

    You can also produce images which you can shrink and enlarge without them becoming blurry or pixelated by simply rasterizing your vector images at the largest size they will be viewed, perhaps not always a viable choice but it works for certain set-ups, I have a game where the images are almost twice the resolution of a Retina iPad screen, so you can zoom in without their quality degrading.

    I like your method of making the images twice the resolution of a retina display. However, if you have a large project will this cause problems in game performance?
    Also, if I want to make my game so that it looks good on ipad, iphone, Android, etc, then I should start from an ipad project and make the different sizes from that since they will all be smaller? I'm very new to all this gamesalad business, obviously. Thanks!
    I've never heard of this rasterize process but will look into how to do it.
  • SocksSocks London, UK.Posts: 12,822Member
    edited February 2014
    dreichelt said:

    I like your method of making the images twice the resolution of a retina display. However, if you have a large project will this cause problems in game performance?

    'A large project' is an arbitrary term, I couldn't really comment without some basic information about the actual project.

    For example a 64 x 64 pixel image would be 4 times Retina resolution if it's placed into a 16 x 16 pixel button actor.

    If a large project (whatever that means) has just a single 2 x 2 pixel actor then it's not going to be much of strain on the target device's processor - but a small project with 14,500 512 x 512 pixel actors is going to make even the most powerful iOS device grind to a halt.

    So 'large' and 'small' are meaningless without sufficient context.

    Then again the large project with just the single 2 x 2 pixel actor might well contain a quarter of a million constrain behaviours (ridiculous I know) in which case the iOS device grinds to a halt again.

    A 400 x 400 pixel actor could be standard resolution, Retina resolution or 16 times Retina resolution (or whatever) depending on how it's displayed on the device.

    Etc etc , , ,

    So without knowing all the other factors you can't really say if a project with higher resolution images will cause problems in game performance.

    It's like saying if I make this box bigger will it cause problems when it comes to getting it through that door over there.
    dreichelt said:

    Also, if I want to make my game so that it looks good on ipad, iphone, Android, etc, then I should start from an ipad project and make the different sizes from that since they will all be smaller?

    It's a mater of choice, a lot of people take that route, but bear in mind the aspect ratio of an iPad is 4:3 whereas most other devices, phones, tablets, tend to be 16:9, so you'd need to keep that in mind when you are designing your 4:3 'master'.
    dreichelt said:

    I've never heard of this rasterize process but will look into how to do it.

    It simply means to turn your vector images into pixel based images, like when you open an Illustrator file into Photoshop.
  • motorcycle boymotorcycle boy Posts: 429Member
    edited February 2014
    Thanks @Socks for the information. I see what you mean about needing to know all the details in order to know if a project is large or not whether that refers to the amount of behaviors created or amount and size of assets brought in; yes I love run on sentences. I don't think I'll be working on anything soon that I'll need to worry about I suppose in regards to taxing the ios device. I'm a baby to this world, so everything is still new and exciting. The rasterization process sounds simple enough even for a photoshop/illustrator illiterate such as myself to do. I'm assuming the pixillation is not visible on the final product? Well I suppose it would be if your end product is a retro style game in the visuals/gameplay. Anyway thanks!
  • Nice thread here.
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