GameSalad

Howdy, Stranger!

It looks like you're new here. If you want to get involved, click one of these buttons!

GDPR the easy way! :)

I was playing several games recently published in the Apple Store and I found the following cases:

1- many games do not ask anythings about the ADs, it may be because I am outside the EU or directly because they do not do anything about GDPR :open_mouth:

2- others have a "privacy policy" button in the options menu that link to a page where they make their declaration

3- many of games, that use Unity ADs, as in the previous point, send to the "same" link:
https://analytics.cloud.unity3d.com/optout?token=lbpg1s6l8j9i97u5003jgjv5ftfv6kgqnf8e9tu6fjt5dc7m

But I did not find any games that do the announcements about GDPR at the beginning because it contains ADs.
I do not want to be more realistic than the king and "scare" users with "pop up" at the beginning of the game that is not strictly necessary and it is enough with link to an external website within the options menu.

What do you think about it?

Comments

  • ArmellineArmelline Posts: 4,604Member, PRO

    The vast majority of games have so far made no attempt to support GDPR. The bottom line is that nobody really knows what expected or where lines will be drawn. GameSalad are acting with an abundance of caution, as is sensible, but realistically nobody is likely to notice or care if you're a bit slow getting your ads sorted or don't deal with it properly.

  • adent42adent42 Posts: 1,159Key Master, Head Chef, Executive Chef, Member, PRO GameSalad Employee
    edited June 7

    Specific to Unity Ads, they do have the option to show ads without private data collection, much like Admob. So games that show no popup could be GDPR compliant, but rather than go through the trouble of getting consent, they just set the network to not collect private data.

    begin "not legal advice" section

    As with any regulation, it's a numbers game:

    1) Someone has to complain.
    2) Someone at the regulatory body has to investigate the complaint.
    3) The body then has to make a determination that you should be fined.
    4) They have to enforce the fine against someone outside of Europe if you're not there.

    I'm guessing most games are banking on luck with 1 and 4 (ie that most game players won't care or that even if it gets all the way through, the EU won't go to the trouble of enforcing the fine for a smaller studio outside Europe).

    end "not legal advice" section

    In any case, we're just ensuring you have the tools to comply with a reasonable interpretation of the law (i.e Google's interpretation) and help you to be good digital citizens.

    We can't force you to follow our suggested guidelines, but we hope you do!

Sign In or Register to comment.